Paper Rose Tutorial

I have put together a small tutorial on how I make my paper roses. I would eventually like to have a video but that may be a bit down the road. The rose is the one on the House of Baratheon Part Two card.

First Petal
First Petal

I created my own pear shape in DrawPlus X6 and imported it into my Silhouette software. I like the control tools in DrawPlus but I do also create images from scratch in the Silhouette program. I cut 12 large petals, for this rose the large petals measure 1.031 inches tall and .656 inches wide (at the largest part). I also cut 12 small petals, which measured .75 inches tall and .469 inches wide. I do not always use 12 small petals but I tend to like a more full rose and this number  seems to work for my roses.

Shaded Petals
Shaded Petals

Next, I add shading to each petal. For this rose I used Distress Ink in Antique Linen and Vintage Photo. I start with the Antique Linen and the Tim Holtz Blending tool. I have one tool for each of my Distress Inks. I add the Vintage Photos to the very edge of each petal.

Shaded petals - close-up
Shaded petals – close-up

While this can be a little tedious, especially if you use a lot of colors to shade your petals, I feel like it really makes the flower look more realistic and gives depth.

Shapping
Shaping the Petals

Next, I soften the petals and begin to give them their shape. For this I use the McGill Paper Blossom Molding Mat and Paper Shaping Tools. The mat is about the texture and feel of a mouse pad. The shaping tools have two metal balls on each end. Each tool has two different sizes. For these petals I did my shaping using the 8mm tool. To shape the petal I put the petal on the mat and rub the ball over the petal, I keep the motion going up and down the length of the petal. The petal will naturally start to curl up as you see in the photo.

Shaping the Base.
Shaping the Base.

Next, I grasp the petal at the base using reverse tweezers the pinch the side of the petal together.

Shaping the Top of the Petal
Shaping the Top of the Petal

Now I grasp the base of the petal and use the reverse tweezers to gently roll the top lobes of the petal to the back.  I drag the tweezes off the edge of the petal, I feel this gives a more rounded shape then if you simply rolled it down.

Base for the Flower
Base for the Flower

The next step is to create the base of the flower. This is where your petals will set. I used the McGill Punch – Alpine Snowflake and the cut the top of the arms off since this rose is smaller then the one made with the punches alone. I put the snowflake on the mat and using the 8mm tool roll it around on the snowflake until it forms a cup shape.

First Layer Assembly
First Layer Assembly

So now that I have done all that work has been done I get to start putting the rose together. Using the arms of the snowflake as a guide I adhere the first six large petals to the base.

Second Layer of Petals
Second Layer of Petals

Then I add the second set of large petals. These petals are placed between the first set so they are off set.

Inner Petals
Inner Petals

Now I add the first layer of small petals. For this rose I started with five petals evenly spaced around the flower. At this point I walk away from my flower and let the petals dry.

Then I take two small petal and using the tweezers I roll them into separate tube. I then place one tube around the other. This tube makes the center of the flower and gets glued in the middle. Once that has dried I add the remaining petals, filling in where it looks correct. Then I will punch the two leaves using the Birch Leaf Punch. I soften the petal with the 8mm tool and then add veining using the 1mm tool. I glue the rose to the card with a generous amount of glue and the add the leaves before the rose dries. This allows me to put the rose where I like it and then add the leaves where they are not going to interfere with any other elements.

Close-up of the competed rose on card.
Close-up of the competed rose on card.

I love making paper flowers and I think they really add a major statement to project. Have a wonderful week!

 

 

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